Stockbridge, Longstock and Leckford

in the Mid-Test Valley Benefice The Mid Test Benefice (parishes Broughton with Bossington, Houghton, Leckford, Longstock, Mottisfont and Stockbridge

St Mary's Church Longstock. MJS 2016
St Mary's Church Longstock. MJS 2016
The Rector/Vicar for the parishes of the Mid Test Benefice is
The Rev'd Philip Bowden. revdphilipbowden@gmail.com
            Telephone:  01264810810

Safeguarding:
If you have concerns here are contact numbers:
Benefice Safeguarding Officer:
David Barnes 01264 810516
barnsiesdandj@yahoo.co.uk
Safeguarding email

SafeguardingMidTestN@outlook.com 

 



Diocesan Safeguarding Officer
Jackie Rowlands 01962 737317
Mobile 07921 865374
Jackie.rowlands@winchester.anglican.org


The Revd Philip Bowden details above

For safeguarding help outside the church. If you have concerns or want to report abuse phone Hampshire Children/Adult Services on 0300 555 1386 or the police on 101.

In an emergency, or if you suspect you or someone else is in immediate danger, phone 999.









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BBC Front Page News

CF Industries: Government to meet CO2 firm's costs to start plant

It comes after one industry group warned shoppers could start noticing gaps on shelves within days.

Boris Johnson and Joe Biden meet at White House

The talks between the UK prime minister and US president come as a possible trade pact is considered.

Gabby Petito: Body found in Wyoming is missing 'van life' blogger

A coroner says the 22-year-old's death was a homicide but gives no details as to how she died.

Pen Farthing: Charity Commission scrutinises Afghan animal rescue

Around 150 animals were evacuated to the UK, along with Paul "Pen" Farthing and animal shelter staff.

Catalogue of errors led to £1bn of state pension underpayments

The National Audit Office says 134,000 pensioners, mostly women, were affected by a preventable scandal.

Melbourne earthquake: Tremor rattles southeast Australia

A 6.0 magnitude earthquake rattles Australia's second largest city, causing damage to buildings.

Overprescribing of medicines must stop, says government

Some prescribed treatments are unnecessary and even harmful, says government-commissioned report.

'No clear end to HS2 cost and delays' say MPs

The Public Accounts Committee is "increasingly alarmed" about key parts of the rail project.

BBC news for Hampshire

Southampton woman trials UK treatment for rare brain disease

Previous sufferers of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy have included the comedian Dudley Moore.

Murder arrest over death of man seen injured in New Milton

Christopher Homer died a week after being captured on CCTV in New Milton with facial injuries.

Hampshire County Council set to axe £20m from children's services

Social care, youth offending, education services and school transport budgets would be affected.

Struck-off doctor remains barred over sexually motivated misconduct

A panel says the Hampshire trainee GP "still did not understand" the seriousness of the allegations.

Coronavirus: Case rates in Hampshire and Isle of Wight

The latest number of cases of Covid-19 across the two counties.

Jonathan Taylor: Oil whistleblower summoned to Monaco

Jonathan Taylor faces questioning over bribery and corruption claims despite a failed extradition bid.

Veterans spend five days in portable toilets for Portsmouth challenge

Four former servicemen complete a charity challenge on Southsea Common to support other veterans.

Sophie Fairall: Celebrity wish-list girl dies from rare cancer

The 10-year-old met TV chef Gordon Ramsay and won support from Premier League footballers.

AskTen - Nine things you may not have noticed last week!

1. How to embrace your creative spark. An Open University survey shows that 61% of people lucky enough to have some free time during 2020 took up creative pursuits, such as reading, knitting, photography or cooking. I discovered a love of gardening. Now that life is getting busier, is it possible to balance so-called “normality” with the creativity some were able to embrace in lockdown? READ MORE >>

2. NI rise could cost jobs. Business leaders have warned that the government’s plan to increase National Insurance could lead to thousands of job losses. The Federation of Small Businesses estimated the tax rise would cost small businesses £5.7bn a year and could put 50,000 jobs at risk, particularly after the furlough scheme ends. Other industry bodies including the British Chambers of Commerce, Make UK and the Confederation of British Industry also warned of the potential impact on jobs and economic recovery as businesses came out of the difficult pandemic period. The Independent

3. Johnson says Taliban has changed. Boris Johnson has told MPs he believes the Taliban has changed. The prime minister said: “What we need to do is to make sure that those elements of the Taliban who are different - and I believe different from the Taliban of 1996 - are encouraged and we put the maximum pressure on them not to allow the more retrograde elements to have the upper hand.” In another softening of rhetoric, Dominic Raab, the foreign secretary, said there was a “clear difference” between the Taliban and terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda. The notion the Taliban has “changed its spots” is for the birds. The Spectator

4. Climate crisis costs hit global GDP. A study from Cambridge University, University College London (UCL) and Imperial College London reports that the climate crisis could cut global GDP by 37% in the next 100 years. Researchers estimate that every tonne of carbon dioxide emitted will knock around £2,170 ($3,000 USD) off the global economy by the end of the century. The study contradicts the widely held belief that climate disasters like floods, droughts and fires do not affect long-term economic growth. A researcher from UCL said: “If we stop assuming that economies recover from such events within months, the costs of warming look much higher than usually stated.” The Guardian

5. Parents say childcare is failing. A survey of more than 20,000 working parents found that 96% believed the government was not doing enough to support parents with the cost and availability of childcare while 97% said childcare in the UK was too expensive. One-third of parents said they paid more for childcare than their rent or mortgage – a proportion that rose to 47% of respondents from a black ethnic background. The House of Commons will hold a debate on childcare today. The Guardian

 
 

6. Oxford retains its global status. University of Oxford has retained the top spot on the 2022 Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings for the sixth year in a row, with traditional rival the University of Cambridge moving up from sixth to fifth. The remainder of the top 10 were rounded out by US-based institutions, but 28 UK universities made it into the top 200, 19 of which improved or maintained their position, with Manchester breaking into the top 50 for the first time. The Times

7. KPMG sets working-class quota. KPMG has become the first big business in Britain to set a target for the number of working-class staff. The accounting and consulting firm is aiming for 29% of its partners and directors to be working class by 2030. It defined working class as having parents with “routine and manual” jobs, such as plumbers, electricians, butchers and van drivers. In Britain, people who come from a privileged rather than a working-class background are 60% more likely to be in a professional job. BBC

8. Why we should not longer see our careers as ladders. The how, why and where we work has changed considerably over the past year for many. So too has the notion of a career and its once-linear trajectory. Careers are less like ladders and more like lattices of vertical and horizontal opportunities. Many in the workforce decided to embrace the changes brought on by the pandemic to acquire new skills or pursue new paths altogether. To support the modern career, encourage employee-led learning and making sure workers are engaged, no matter where they sit. Editor

9. Fairytale of New York. The delightful Emma Raducanu pulled off the fairytale feat of winning the US Open. She becomes the first qualifier in the Open era to win a Slam and is elevated to British number one. At the start of the year, this inspirational young woman was ranked number 345 in the world and less than three months ago was sitting her A Levels. She has raised all our spirits and is a wonderful British story. Editor

10. The bottom line. Changes to how social care is funded should be welcomed but the system is being exploited by “rapacious” private care providers. The latest accounts for Runwood Homes show the firm tripled dividend payouts and handed one director £3m last year, while recruiting staff “on 9p above the minimum wage to look after people with dementia at night”. The i Paper

Covid Updates for Hampshire

Click the the latest news on Covid within Longstock https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51768274

The latest BBC Video News clips

Ros Atkins on... the UK's rising energy bills

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The night my baby died as I gave birth in prison

Louise Powell says her baby died "due to errors" made after she went into labour in prison.

Prince Philip: Grandchildren recall a favourite royal prank

The personal reflections on the Duke of Edinburgh's sense of humour are part of a BBC documentary.

Boris Johnson on wages, prices and supermarket shortages

The prime minister says he does “not believe people will be short of food” amid reports of some empty supermarket shelves.

A year in Calais: One migrant’s year-long attempt to cross the Channel

The BBC followed Iranian migrant Alex, as he tried to cross from France to the UK with a smuggler.

Can compost help change capitalism?

John Cossham wants more people to take up composting to encourage a circular economy.

Emmy Awards 2021: The Crown and Ted Lasso win big

Netflix drama The Crown and Apple TV Plus comedy Ted Lasso were the stars of the Emmy Award.